Untitled

postracialcomments:

hood2go:

2yungkings

I have never had baby fever so much until this moment

They bout to be toooooo smooth when they get older

But who da fuck is you tho?
Someone who is quite unclear as to why you feel you are entitled to interject an opinion or statement about a matter that is none of your concern. (via  )

neffyfrofro:

Blak Majik

nikkisshadetree:

itsdivaduh:

They don’t hear u though!!!!!

👆👆👆

nikkisshadetree:

itsdivaduh:

They don’t hear u though!!!!!

👆👆👆

rock-my-boatey:

"Think like a queen. A queen is not afraid to fail. Failure is another steppingstone to greatness." - Oprah Winfrey
Happy International Women’s day

rock-my-boatey:

"Think like a queen. A queen is not afraid to fail. Failure is another steppingstone to greatness."
- Oprah Winfrey

Happy International Women’s day

soulbrotherv2:

I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era  by David Williams
For a century and a half, Abraham Lincoln’s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation has been the dominant narrative of African American freedom in the Civil War era. However, David Williams suggests that this portrayal marginalizes the role that African American slaves played in freeing themselves.
At the Civil War’s outset, Lincoln made clear his intent was to save the Union rather than free slaves - despite his personal distaste for slavery, he claimed no authority to interfere with the institution. By the second year of the war, though, when the Union army was in desperate need of black support, former slaves who escaped to Union lines struck a bargain: they would fight for the Union if it committed itself to freedom.
Williams importantly demonstrates that freedom was not simply the absence of slavery but rather a dynamic process enacted by self-emancipated African American refugees, which compelled Lincoln to modify his war aims and place black freedom at the center of his wartime policies.
[book link]

soulbrotherv2:

I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era  by David Williams

For a century and a half, Abraham Lincoln’s signing of the Emancipation Proclamation has been the dominant narrative of African American freedom in the Civil War era. However, David Williams suggests that this portrayal marginalizes the role that African American slaves played in freeing themselves.

At the Civil War’s outset, Lincoln made clear his intent was to save the Union rather than free slaves - despite his personal distaste for slavery, he claimed no authority to interfere with the institution. By the second year of the war, though, when the Union army was in desperate need of black support, former slaves who escaped to Union lines struck a bargain: they would fight for the Union if it committed itself to freedom.

Williams importantly demonstrates that freedom was not simply the absence of slavery but rather a dynamic process enacted by self-emancipated African American refugees, which compelled Lincoln to modify his war aims and place black freedom at the center of his wartime policies.

[book link]